Can you really change your life in 30 days?

Congratulations, you made it to a new year and now we are staring down the month of February.  What does that mean?  The death of “resolution season”.  You know, the time when the gyms that were bursting to the seams full Jan 2 start to clear out and when those motivational podcasts get shuffled to the back of your library.


We live in a culture of Tik Tok and short attention spans; if you’re anything like me your newsfeed is full of sponsored posts for a whole host of quick fix solutions. From getting you in shape fast to making you millions a million solutions are out there - all faster and easier than you could ever imagine!


As I sit back watching the hype and the resolutions scroll by it makes me wonder, are the small things really the big things?  Can making small changes to your daily routine really change your life in 30 days or less?


U.S. Elite as a company have been doing a bunch of reading, thinking, and talking lately about the Ouroboros - the infinite cycle of growth, evolution and renewal that is our logo.  While we have been talking about it in the context of a number of really exciting projects we have in the works, it is equally applicable to each of us as individuals.  You educate yourself, train and search out the best gear to elevate your performance.  All of this is born from the desire for self-improvement.  


Desire is the fire that moves us towards our goals, but just like fire it needs fuel and oxygen to keep burning.  The fuel to keep that desire burning is your motivation - the deep down why you care about your goal - and the oxygen that keeps it burning is persistent consistency.


Let’s be real for a second - persistence and consistency are really freaking hard.  That’s why so many people struggle to keep up with those New Year’s resolutions.  Luckily, there is a powerful tool that can help you build both of those things - habit.


The secret sauce to making any behavior stick effortlessly is to make it into a habit.


I’m a weird combination of cynical and “give people the benefit of the doubt” who lives by the maxim of “Trust, but verify”.  It all seems a little too good to be true that implementing small habits that take 15 minutes or less per day could have a massive impact on your life, but isn’t the only way to know for sure to put my money where my mouth is and find out for myself?


So, starting in February some of the U.S. Elite Team will be embarking on a challenge to implement one new habit for 30 days to see if it really does change our lives.  Maybe you will join us?


Here are the ground rules:

  1. Implementing the habit can’t be expensive.  You must be able to implement the habit with no more than $100 and readily available equipment that most people will have on hand.
  2. The total time per day required must be less than 30 minutes, ideally less than 15.
  3. When quantifiable results are possible a baseline will be set and another measurement taken at the end of the 30 days.
  4. If quantifiable results are impractical or impossible subjective observations will be recorded.

At the end of 30 days, we’ll report back our findings along with any amusing anecdotes and parse out whether or not the habit stuck and if it had any sort of impact.


The first habit that we will be tackling will be -  in true New Year’s resolution fashion - a fitness habit.


We are going to see if doing 50 push-ups a day for the month of February gives us any noticeable gains in strength, endurance, or (hopefully) sex appeal.


The RULES

  1. We will start the month with a 2 minute max effort push-up test to give us a baseline.  Thighs, hips and chest must touch at the bottom of the rep and elbows must be locked out at the top of the rep.
  2. You can break up your 50 push-ups into as many sets as you want throughout the day.
  3. At the end of the month we will re-test the 2 minute max effort push-ups to see if we improved.

We’d love to have you complete the challenge along with us!  Tag @uselitegear on Facebook or IG.



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